Archives for posts with tag: printmaking

Referring to a sketch that had been drawn from life using my iPad while in Penn Station, I drew/painted the image on the copper plate that was used in the monotype process. Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

Referring to a sketch that had been drawn from life using my iPad while in Penn Station, I drew/painted the image on the copper plate that was used in the monotype process. Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

One day last month I noticed that there was going to be a nearly free ($3) three hour workshop taught by printmakers from EFA Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop at The Studio Museum in Harlem. I jumped at the chance to learn about Pronto Plate Lithography. I’ve done stone lithography before but HATED lugging around a very heavy stone. Gotta be nuts. Anyway, these plates are lighter than a feather and you can draw on them with practically anything. I decided to sketch a JKPPer. They gave each of us a Sharpie marker and an ordinary ballpoint pen (plus litho ink, brayer, bowl of water, sponge), a 10 minute demonstration and set everyone loose. They helped us with the press.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose) I found the reference photo on Flickr when I was searching for someone else.

Pronto plate, Sharpie marker, ballpoint pen, litho ink, printmaking paper, etching press.

Well, I guess I was getting tired because this transfer monotype was Really Over-inked. I’m supposed to improve – not get worse! Thank goodness for acrylic paint.

Then I attempted drawing with ink using a chopstick. I had my doubts but it does work. This time I used Caran d’ache Neocolor II crayons.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

#1 Akua Intaglio Ink, plexiglass, Japanese paper; acrylic paint

#2 waterproof ink, chopstick, Caran d’ache Neocolor II, waterbrush

My second attempt monoprinting with the Akua Intaglio Ink was semi-successful. It’s different printing with waterbased inks in a kitchen from printing with oil based ink and using a press. I need practice and this was just the first day. There was too much ink on the plate so the monotype was not very good. Out came the acrylic paint.

Sigh. I over-inked the plate again for the transfer monotype. That’s one of my problems – discerning the right amount of ink.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

Akua Intaglio Ink, plexiglass, Japanese paper.

I bought a jar of Akua Waterbased Intaglio Ink and tried mono printing on a small square of plexiglass on my boardonironingboard studio annex. It works! My first try needed a bit of touch up with some of the ink and a brush – but not much.

I tried printing a ghost image but it was too pale and washed out. Almost tossed in the trash but decided to see what would happen if I painted over it with acrylic. Warhol-ish Jill.

And, of course, I tried a transfer monotype which worked nicely. Maybe less ink on the plate would be better. Someday I’ll paint this one also.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

Akua Ink, plexiglass, paper (Japanese and something else)

The transfer monotype.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.
There was enough ink left on the plate with the line work from the transfer process to use as guidelines for working up a dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press.

Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

The transfer monotype:

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.
There was enough ink left on the plate with the line work from the transfer process to use as guidelines for working up a dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press.

Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

**
The transfer monotype:

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.
There was enough ink left on the plate with the line work from the transfer process to use as guidelines for working up a dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press.

Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

The transfer monotype:

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.
There was enough ink left on the plate with the line work from the transfer process to use as guidelines for working up a dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press.

Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.