Archives for posts with tag: mixed media

I covered one side of the Kraft paper the first hour hour.

The next hour I flipped it over and covered the back with thick waxy lines.

After 4 hours I had achieved exactly what I came for – 2 sheets covered front and back. I wasn’t interested in the competition. One look around revealed that some very serious artists had shown up. Maybe I was the only one relaxed and having fun?

At the end of the evening, while drawings were being presented to the judges, I slipped my sketch-covered Kraft paper back into the pad. The first part of my plan was successfully finished. At home in the following days the next part, painting, folding and binding the drawings into a book went exactly as I envisioned it.

Kraft paper (both sides of two sheets), mechanical pencil, lithography pencil. At home: acrylic paint; waxed thread for binding into an 8 page pamphlet.

The other week found me in The Salmagundi Club where the Drawing New York Meetup Group organized a Portrait and Figure Drawing competition. There were three models. One figure model assumed the same pose for the entire 4 hours, one changed position each hour and the portrait model also kept the same pose for the duration. Every 20 minutes there was a break.

My attention wanders so every time my model took a break I moved to another spot and sketched the same pose from a different angle.

We were all obeying Simon’s exhortations for silence during the poses.

Since everyone was so focused no one noticed me scratching away on some brown Kraft paper with a clunky waxy lithography pencil. I wasn’t going for finesse – I had a plan.

Kraft paper (both sides of two sheets), mechanical pencil, lithography pencil. At home: acrylic paint; waxed thread for binding into an 8 page pamphlet.

What was stealthy about this? Well maybe the gigantic Milton Avery book that was opened in front of me and the stack of mysteries separating me from everyone else. I was a camouflaged sketcher.

It helped that no one was paying any attention also.

Stillman and Birn Zeta sketchbook, pencil, Woody water soluble black crayon. Acrylic paint later at home. Commercial alphabet stamps and Stayz On pigment ink.

This monotype was a bit “grey” so I was ambivalent about it. The watersoluble crayons saved it.

The ghost with a change of clothes.

Referring to a sketch, that had been drawn from life in a tiny gridded notebook one day while in Union Square Park, I drew/painted the image on the copper plate that was used in the monotype process. Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

Ghost:
Japanese printmaking paper;

Monotype and ghost print enhanced with Inktense pencil, Caran d’Ache Neocolor II

I was really unhappy with the monotype that produced this ghost print which was worse. No one was ever going to see either I decided, but, even though the print was awful I kinda liked the drawing. I let it hang out awhile where I could see it and mutter “ugh” each time I passed by. With nothing to lose I took the watersoluble crayons and pencils to both the print and ghost and am very happy with the results. I prefer the ghost even though the original monotype is basically the same.

Japanese printmaking paper; Monotype ghost print enhanced with Caran d’Ache Neocolor II and Inktense pencils.

Again, I had too much ink on the plate when I did this transfer monotype. Nothing acrylic paint couldn’t fix. A mess of a portrait transformed.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.

Oil based printing ink, Japanese paper, acrylic paint.

This transfer monotype was awful – too much ink on the plate rendered the drawing almost indistinguishable. I was disappointed but saved it to play with at home. With nothing to lose I painted over the print with acrylic. Success!

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.

Oil based printing ink, Japanese paper, acrylic paint.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.

Oil based printing ink, Japanese paper, Caran d’Ache Neocolor II

I added some acrylic paint and Caran d’Ache Neocolor II Crayons to this print.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.

Oil based printing ink, Japanese paper, Acrylic Paint, Neocolor II

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.

Oil based printing ink, Japanese paper, Neocolor II water soluble crayons.