Archives for posts with tag: EDiJuly

I thought, since I’ve been drawing all month on 2-1/2″ x 3-1/2″ roughly-applied-acrylic-paint-covered playing cards and it is Very Very Hot and Humid, that this was a much better idea than “combine as many topics as you can into a single sketch”.

And.

Yum. I don’t care if you disagree.

(No, I did not eat 31 of them!)
Drawn from direct observation quickly – remember, it is very hot.
EDiJuly=Every Day in July, Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps.

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#28 “Three Ornaments from a Bridle”; mid-17th century; India; Islamic; Medium: Silver; stamped, punched, gilded.
From the Met’s website: “In paintings of Mughal courtly life, horses and elephants appear as richly adorned as their royal riders. These silver pairs of fish were fabricated from stamped and punched silver and arranged in rows on horses’ bridles in seventeenth century India. The motif of the fish appeared on Mughal decorative objects as part of their royal insignia.”

# 29 It seems that, unbeknownst to me, I have a hobby. I am happy when I reach Penn Station and discover that my train just pulled out. This forces me to take out my iPad, sketchbook, Gelli printed playing cards, wrinkled paper bag and/or gessoed gallery brochure and sketch commuters. Yes! Commuters are my hobby. I have hundreds of faceless train waiters scattered all over the place. I thought pears were my problem but I’ve just been kidding myself.

#30 This is what invariably happens: let’s suppose I’m joining my urban sketching friends for several hours of of outdoor sketching and lunch will be consumed on the spot. Well, I typically will pick something up in Penn Station (and will sketch a commuter or two if I have enough time) to eat later and also a bottle of water because, intellectually, I realize I should drink something besides coffee. I never drink the water. It winds up in my refrigerator at the end of the day, along with water from airlines and the free ones water company representatives pass out on the street. So, is this select grouping of disparate water bottles (full) a thinly disguised hobby or just a blatant collection?

Drawn from direct observation. EDiJuly=Every Day in July, Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps.

#25 I found this right in the same display where I discovered the aquamanile I sketched a few weeks ago. I never noticed it hanging there at the time.
Lion mask door pull, ca. 1425–50
Germany; Nuremberg; Copper alloy
From a card on the wall, in the Met, next to the door pull: “Door pulls in the form of lion masks were a feature of many medieval churches throughout the Middle Ages. Such pulls functioned not only as decorative door hardware but also as sanctuary rings, symbols of the protection the church offered to those fleeing legal prosecution and other dangers.”

#26 & 27 I didn’t have to go traipsing very far to find these items.

Drawn from direct observation. EDiJuly=Every Day in July, Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps.

#22 I found this small statue in one of the galleries at the Met. First I made a practice sketch since it seemed so intricate. Then I whipped out the next playing card and sketched for real.
“Two girls playing a game known as ephedrismos”; late 4th–3rd century B.C.
Greek, Corinthian; Terracotta;

From the Met’s website: “This terracotta group depicts two young girls playing ephedrismos. …the game involves throwing balls or pebbles at a stone in an attempt to overturn it. The player who fails to do so is blindfolded and must run to touch the stone while carrying the winner on her back. Here the little girl carries her companion but does not have her eyes covered. Both young girls are dressed in chitons and have red curly hair. The rider, the obvious winner, wears a stephanos, or crown; the carrier wears a thick floral wreath.”

#23 A detail from the cover of “The Expressionists”, Wolf-Dieter Dube. This is a detail of the painting by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, “Self Portrait with Model”, 1910. A few days before drawing this I did a iPad sketch and painting of the whole thing (except the easel held in his hand at the left edge of the book cover because I didn’t realize what it was until I was finished – thought it was just a schmear of expressionistic paint.)

#24 This is me drawing the reflection of my hand as it is drawing. Not so easy.

It kept moving.

Drawn from direct observation. EDiJuly=Every Day in July, Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps.

#19 Marble capital and finial in the form of a sphinx; ca. 530 B.C.; Greek;
From the Met’s website: “The sphinx, a mythological creature with a lion’s body and a human head, was known in various forms throughout the eastern Mediterranean region from the Bronze Age onward. The Greeks represented it as a winged female and often placed its image on grave monuments as guardian of the dead.”

#20 & 21 These could be interchangeable – both were drawn en plein air and both are plants. One was sketched while I was in Bryant Park last week and the other looms over a Home Depot, Michael’s and various other stores. I sat in my car with the AC on and a couple of coupons on the seat next to me in case I felt the urge to shop. After I drew the humongous recycling plant on the Very Small playing card I took out my iPad and did another sketch of it. Tomorrow that one will be on my blog. I was a bit amazed at how easy this structure was to draw.

Drawn from direct observation. EDiJuly=Every Day in July, Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps.

#16 I’m glad we are now able to enter artwork to shows digitally. Saves a lot of $$$.

#17 Drawn from the painting in the Met:  After Amedeo Modigliani; “Lola de Valence”, 1915; Oil on Paper, mounted on wood. It called to me from across the room and was right up my alley. I consider anything painted before my mother was born to be “classical”. As per the card next to the painting: Lola was a famous dancer who had previously modeled for Édouard Manet. “…his African-influenced sculptural style was a touchstone for his painted portraits until his untimely death in 1920.”

#18 Rolling Stones song “Under My Thumb”. I keep this item nearby to sketch.

Drawn from direct observation.
EDiJuly=Every Day in July, Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps. Collage (#18).

I’m still walking around with The List and finding areas of the Met I never noticed and looking at things that I would just pass over. Ho hum. Items take on a new life when you stop to sketch them.

#13. “Kneeling Female Deity”, Mexico; Aztec; 15th-early 16th century; Basalt

#14 while waiting for our friends in Grand Central Station last week Gwen and I sketched one of the many soldiers who keep us safe in the train stations every day.

#15 I don’t think this is crazy or silly. It is odd simply because I’ve never seen an instrument like this before. It is actually quite interesting and beautiful and I enjoyed standing in the dark sketching it and working out where all the pieces go. “Zanze”, late 19th Century; Congolese; wood. From a label on the wall: “It is an instrument consisting of thin tongues of metal or split cane, mounted on a resonating board or box. Depressing the free ends of the tongues with the thumbs produces a gentle ringing sound, sometimes augmented by jingling objects attached to the board, and amplified by holding the instrument in a hollow gourd. Tuning is accomplished by sliding the tongues in or out in order to change their vibrating length.”

Drawn from direct observation.
EDiJuly=Every Day in July, Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps.

#10 I found this “Aquamanile in the Form of a Horse”, ca. 1400, German (Nuremberg), Copper alloy; during one of my Metropolitan Museum of Art Treasure Hunts. Before I happened upon this display I tried to sketch two different horse carvings with disastrous results. I was only able to draw the front part of this beautiful vessel on the small playing card. There is also a strange creature hanging onto the horse’s back. From Wikipedia: ” In modern usage, an aquamanile is a ewer or jug-type vessel in the form of one or more animal or human figures. It usually contained water for the washing of hands (aqua + manos) over a basin…Historically the term was sometimes used for any shape of basin or ewer so used, regardless of shape. Most surviving examples are in metal, typically copper alloys as pottery versions have rarely survived.”

#11 I was puzzled about this prompt for awhile. But then I remembered my friend’s husband’s daily habit and I asked her to save me a used one. And she did.

#12 another friend was handy, concentrating and sitting still the other day so, standing in front of her without blocking her view, I sketched on a playing card. I don’t remember if we actually saw her fall off the high chair at the Chelsea gallery three years ago or if we just heard the ENORMOUS thump (crash! bang! boom!) of the fall. (Hmm. I just remembered something. We were all very PUZZLED at the time as to how this FALL could have occurred, and in hindsight, if a HORSE had been available, we could have moistened her brow with some of its “water”.)

Drawn from direct observation. EDiJuly=Every Day in July, Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps and a bit of collage.

#7 I’ve had this coffee pot for decades. I think it was a hand-me-down from some people who stayed with me a few summer weeks a couple of times and it was the only way to get a decent cup of coffee here. I don’t have a clue how to make coffee with this thing. It is an excellent model though.

#8 this was one of my finds from my Treasure Hunt visit to the Met on Tuesday. A small detail from “Ariadne”, 1913, oil and graphite on canvas, painted by Giorgio de Chirico. From the Met’s website:
“A statue of a slumbering Ariadne is in the foreground of this image of a desolate public square, rendered in de Chirico’s distinctive simple and broad forms. According to the Greek myth, Theseus abandoned his lover Ariadne on the island of Naxos while she slept. Ariadne acquired great personal symbolic meaning for de Chirico after he moved to Paris in 1911 and entered a period of isolation and loneliness. A dreamy escape into the classical past, the painting also serves as a retreat into de Chirico’s memories of his childhood in Greece.”

#9 There was no sunshine yesterday so my plans for a dramatic outdoor shadow was thwarted. As I wandered around the house mumbling to myself I noticed the apples were clamoring for attention.

Drawn from direct observation.
EDiJuly=Every Day in July
Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps.

#4 is the local pool on a hot day.
#5 I work in a microbiology lab where these specimen containers come in from hospitals, clinics, doctor’s offices, etc. These particular ones are ALWAYS “yuck!”.
#6 the same workplace had a big multi-month walking challenge in which they gave every employee (thousands) a pedometer. This was a couple/few years ago but I have found it to be a very motivating thing to put in my pocket every day.

Drawn from direct observation.
EDiJuly=Every Day in July.
Playing Cards, acrylic painted background, Sharpie Ultra Fine, Fine and/or Medium pens; Pitt Brush Pens; commercial alphabet and number stamps.