Archives for category: Printmaking

One day last month I noticed that there was going to be a nearly free ($3) three hour workshop taught by printmakers from EFA Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop at The Studio Museum in Harlem. I jumped at the chance to learn about Pronto Plate Lithography. I’ve done stone lithography before but HATED lugging around a very heavy stone. Gotta be nuts. Anyway, these plates are lighter than a feather and you can draw on them with practically anything. I decided to sketch a JKPPer. They gave each of us a Sharpie marker and an ordinary ballpoint pen (plus litho ink, brayer, bowl of water, sponge), a 10 minute demonstration and set everyone loose. They helped us with the press.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose) I found the reference photo on Flickr when I was searching for someone else.

Pronto plate, Sharpie marker, ballpoint pen, litho ink, printmaking paper, etching press.

Well, I guess I was getting tired because this transfer monotype was Really Over-inked. I’m supposed to improve – not get worse! Thank goodness for acrylic paint.

Then I attempted drawing with ink using a chopstick. I had my doubts but it does work. This time I used Caran d’ache Neocolor II crayons.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

#1 Akua Intaglio Ink, plexiglass, Japanese paper; acrylic paint

#2 waterproof ink, chopstick, Caran d’ache Neocolor II, waterbrush

My second attempt monoprinting with the Akua Intaglio Ink was semi-successful. It’s different printing with waterbased inks in a kitchen from printing with oil based ink and using a press. I need practice and this was just the first day. There was too much ink on the plate so the monotype was not very good. Out came the acrylic paint.

Sigh. I over-inked the plate again for the transfer monotype. That’s one of my problems – discerning the right amount of ink.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

Akua Intaglio Ink, plexiglass, Japanese paper.

I bought a jar of Akua Waterbased Intaglio Ink and tried mono printing on a small square of plexiglass on my boardonironingboard studio annex. It works! My first try needed a bit of touch up with some of the ink and a brush – but not much.

I tried printing a ghost image but it was too pale and washed out. Almost tossed in the trash but decided to see what would happen if I painted over it with acrylic. Warhol-ish Jill.

And, of course, I tried a transfer monotype which worked nicely. Maybe less ink on the plate would be better. Someday I’ll paint this one also.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

Akua Ink, plexiglass, paper (Japanese and something else)

The transfer monotype.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.
There was enough ink left on the plate with the line work from the transfer process to use as guidelines for working up a dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press.

Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

The transfer monotype:

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.
There was enough ink left on the plate with the line work from the transfer process to use as guidelines for working up a dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press.

Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

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The transfer monotype:

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.
There was enough ink left on the plate with the line work from the transfer process to use as guidelines for working up a dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press.

Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

The transfer monotype:

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

A piece of thin Japanese printmaking paper was placed onto an inked copper plate and, with a ball point pen that no longer had ink, I drew, referring to a JKPP Flickr group photo (that I reversed using my iPad), on the back of the Japanese paper. The result was a Transfer Monotype.
There was enough ink left on the plate with the line work from the transfer process to use as guidelines for working up a dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press.

Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

One December Saturday I went into the city for an all day Monotype Madness held at the Salmagundi Club. I arrived at 10 am and crawled out at 6:30 pm with lots of prints and a tired smile. I had a plan and after I finished a series of prints depicting Penn Station commuters I started on the next phase – monoprinting JKPP portraits – working from photos I reversed in iPat. I started with a mistake that turned into a learning opportunity. The plan was to first do a transfer monotype, re-ink the copper plate and then do a dark field method monotype of the same image. Well, the joke was on me, too much ink on the plate left my transfer print image as a big black blob. Picture me kicking myself. I saw that the copper plate still had ink and the lines from my drawing were clearly visible so, throwing caution to the wind I proceeded to wipe away and, since I wasn’t sure if there actually was enough ink left for a decent print, I relaxed and worked quickly and looser than ever.

JKPP = Julia Kay’s Portrait Party (referred to photo put on JKPP Flickr Group supplied by subject for this purpose)

Dark field (subtractive) monotype which then went through the press. Oil based printing ink, Arches printmaking paper, etching press.

After I did a transfer monotype (seen in a previous post some time ago) using this drawing, I noticed that there was sufficient ink remaining on the copper plate so I decided to keep working on the plate and run it through the press. Well, it printed out just fine, but I hated it. Destined for the garbage heap. One day last week I was using acrylics for a project I’ve been working on and decided to see what would happen if I painted over the oil based printing ink.

I referred to a sketch that had been drawn from life in a small gridded notebook and then colored in my iPAD while on the High Line with NYC Urban Sketchers. Arches printmaking paper.
Acrylic paint